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Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
3:22pm
Tue Sep 15

National Report Details 'True Cost' Of Incarceration On Families

A national report released Tuesday aims to shed light on the hidden impacts mass incarceration has on families and their economic stability, health and well-being.

Over 20 community-based organizations from across the country, including the Chicago-based Workers Center for Racial Justice (WCRJ), spent more than a year developing the report, which is based on over 1,100 surveys of formerly incarcerated people, families with incarcerated loved ones and employers.

"Everyone knows about the $80 billion that our cities and states and the federal government (spend) locking people up, but what is not known is the amount of money that we incur when ourselves and loved ones get locked up," WCRJ's Executive Director DeAngelo Bester said at a Tuesday press conference in Chicago.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
9:44am
Tue Sep 15

Irregular Work Schedules Taking A Toll On Families, Experts Say

Unpredictable and non-standard job schedules can negatively impact the development of children and adolescents whose parent work such shifts, and policy changes are needed to improve workplace scheduling practices, experts argue in a recent issue brief published by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI).

Children of all ages whose parents have erratic or non-standard job schedules are at higher risk for adverse cognitive and behavioral outcomes, reads the brief, authored by University of New South Wales lecturer Leila Morsy and EPI research associate Richard Rothstein.

"When parents can't predict when they will or won't be working, their entire home lives are disrupted -- they engage less with their children in critical activities like reading and telling stories," Morsy said in a statement. "In many states, parents working irregular schedules even lose eligibility for child care subsidies."

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
10:58am
Mon Sep 14

Illinois Women Won't Achieve Equal Pay Until 2065, Report Finds

The year 2065.

That's when Illinois women are projected to achieve equal pay in the state, if the current rate of progress in closing the gender wage gap continues, shows a recent report from the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR).

Of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, women in Illinois -- who currently make 80 cents on average for every dollar earned by men -- have the 25th shortest wait until they will see equal pay.

In other states, women born today probably will not achieve pay equality during their lifetime if current trends continue.

PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
10:57am
Fri Sep 11

Report: 44% Of Illinois Private Sector Workers Are Without Paid Sick Days

Forty-four percent of private sector workers in Illinois, or more than 2.1 million individuals, cannot earn paid sick days, shows a recent report by the National Partnership for Women & Families.

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