Explore our content

All types | All dates | All authors
Kelly Cassidy

Pages

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
6:32pm
Tue Apr 12

On Equal Pay Day, Dems Slam Republicans Over Federal Inaction On Paycheck Fairness

Tuesday is Equal Pay Day, marking how far into 2016 women must work in order to earn what men made in 2015.

Women today still earn just 79 cents on average for every dollar paid to men. For African-American women and Latinas, the wage gap widens to 60 cents and 55 cents, respectively, according to an analysis by the National Partnership for Women & Families.

Equal pay advocates say it's time to end the gender wage gap, which could be closed in part by passage of the long-proposed federal Paycheck Fairness Act. Under the bill, employees could share salary information between co-workers without retaliation, among other provisions.

Some Democrats are using Equal Pay Day to slam Congressional Republicans over their repeated efforts against the legislation. 

U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL,8) is among the Democratic cosponsors of the Paycheck Fairness Act. Duckworth, who is running for incumbent Mark Kirk's (R-IL) Senate seat, is seeking to draw a contrast with her opponent on equal pay issues.

Quick Hit
by Ashlee Rezin
2:16pm
Thu Feb 18

Illinois Rep. Cassidy Seeks To Increase Inmate Access To GED Education (VIDEO)

In an effort to reduce recidivism, State Rep. Kelly Cassidy (D-Chicago) introduced legislation last week that would increase "timely and comprehensive" access to GED education for Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) inmates.

"I think that the general public would be surprised to hear how little programming is available for the folks that are incarcerated in our facilities," Cassidy said at a news conference at the Howard Area Community Center in Chicago's Rogers Park neighborhood on the North Side.

Joined by formerly incarcerated men and activists from the ONE Northside Violence Prevention Coalition, Cassidy said the legislation aims to turn the IDOC "into something whose mission is dedicated to the act of making someone better."

Quick Hit
by Ashlee Rezin
11:18am
Fri Sep 25, 2015

Chicago Soup Kitchen Sees Uptick Of Those In Need, Leaders Blame Ongoing Budget Standoff (VIDEO)

A soup kitchen on Chicago's North Side says they've seen an uptick in the number of individuals depending on their free meals since the state's budget impasse started nearly three months ago.

On Thursday, representatives from the kitchen joined with state Rep. Kelly Cassidy (D-Chicago) and other nonprofits to call for an end to the standoff and urge lawmakers to fully fund the services Illinois' most vulnerable citizens depend upon.

"A lot of the folks that come to the community kitchen rely on services that are being slashed, so they have to come here," said Rev. Marilyn Pagan Banks, executive director of A Just Harvest, which serves free meals every day to people in need at 7649 N. Paulina St. in the Rogers Park neighborhood.

PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
10:41am
Tue Aug 11, 2015

Protesters Call For A Fair State Budget Outside Home Of Rauner Campaign Donor (VIDEO)

Illinois "Moral Monday" activists protested for a "fair and just" state budget in Chicago's Uptown neighborhood and outside the Lincoln Park home of a top campaign donor for Gov. Bruce Rauner. Progress Illinois was there for the Monday evening demonstration.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
5:57pm
Thu Mar 27, 2014

Illinois Lawmakers Wage Fight Against Water-Polluting Agents In Cosmetic Products; BP Oil Spill Clean Up Continues (UPDATED)

An extremely small plastic pollutant poses a big threat to the health of the Great Lakes and the state's environment. And some Illinois lawmakers are looking to take action against the problem.

At issue are the super-tiny plastic beads used in hundreds of personal cosmetic products like facial wash, body scrubs and even toothpaste. According to scientists, tens of millions of these little plastic particles have made their way into the Great Lakes.

The cosmetic microbeads, which are less than 5 millimeters in size and commonly used to help with exfoliation, often get washed down household drains. Because the plastic beads are so small, they are not captured during the water treatment process, allowing them to get into waterways.

"There's no way to recover those materials once they're out in open waters," said Olga Lyandres, research manager at the Alliance for the Great Lakes. "Once they enter the environment, they stay there."

Pages