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Quick Hit
by La Risa Lynch
7:58pm
Wed Nov 5, 2014

Chicago West Side Voters React to Quinn's Gubernatorial Loss

Support for Gov. Quinn seemed strong among black voters in Chicago's Austin community on Tuesday, but that didn't translate into a win for the incumbent who was seeking his second full-term in office.

Quinn lost his re-election bid to Republican challenger Bruce Rauner, who dumped $27 million of his own money into his campaign war chest. 

Rauner and his running mate Evelyn Sanguinetti garnered 1,742,403 or 50.6 percent of the vote versus Quinn's 1,585,332 or 46 percent of the votes.

An early Rauner supporter, Rev. Marshall Hatch said he was not surprised by the election results. Hatch said Quinn's low approval rating signaled a pending change. Quinn, he added, made a major misstep by selecting Paul Vallas as his running mate as opposed to former city treasurer Stephanie Neely. That move, Hatch said, showed Quinn took the black community for granted.

"I think Quinn left the Republicans a major opening," said Hatch, pastor of New Mount Pilgrim Baptist Church in West Garfield Park.

PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
6:03pm
Wed Nov 5, 2014

Illinoisans Overwhelmingly Back Statewide Advisory Ballot Questions — Now What?

Progress Illinois chats with political scientists about the likelihood of Springfield lawmakers taking up the three statewide voter-backed advisory ballot questions.

Quick Hit
by Bob Skolnik
6:10pm
Tue Nov 4, 2014

Voters Offer Dueling Views On Governor's Race In Southwestern Suburbs

How one voted in the governor's race is not an infallible indication of how someone voted on the non-binding referendum to raise the minimum wage. At least that's the case at the polling place at the Crest Hill branch of the White Oak Library District, where subdivisions meet cornfields on the outskirts of Lockport and Joliet in Will County.

Michael Arbanas, a semi-retired iron worker and antiques dealer from Crest Hill, voted for Bruce Rauner for governor, but also voted in favor of raising the minimum wage.

"I believe that Pat Quinn, by raising taxes on big business, he drove business out of the state and I think it's time for a change," Arbanas said.

PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
8:01pm
Fri Oct 31, 2014

Vallas Criticizes Rauner's Position On Charter Schools, Education Issues

Paul Vallas, Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn's running mate, talks with Progress Illinois about important issues at stake in the November gubernatorial election and his priorities for the lieutenant governor's office if elected.

Quick Hit
by Aricka Flowers
8:25pm
Thu Oct 23, 2014

McKinney, Clout & The Freedom Of The Press: Where Would Illinois Be Headed Under Rauner's Reign? (UPDATED)

Former Chicago Sun-Times Springfield Bureau Chief Dave McKinney's resignation from the paper is fueling players in both the political and media worlds to speculate about not only the future of the Windy City's oldest news publication, but also what it means for journalism in the state in a greater sense -- and what a Rauner-ruled Illinois could look like.

After 19 years at the newspaper, McKinney issued his immediate resignation Wednesday, stating in an open letter that, essentially, he had no choice but to make the "difficult decision due to the disturbing developments I've experienced in the last two weeks that cannot be reconciled with this newspaper's storied commitment to journalism."

The "disturbing developments" stem from the newspaper's response to the "multiple tactics" GOP gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner's campaign deployed in an attempt to stop the publication of a story co-written by McKinney, Carol Marin and Don Moseley. The article detailed allegations that Rauner threatened a former employee, ex-LeapSource CEO Christine Kirk, as well as her family when it became clear that she planned to sue Rauner and his then-investment firm GTCR. Despite threats from the Republican's campaign stating they would "go over" the heads of those working on the story, according to McKinney, the piece ran.

And that's when the Rauner camp reportedly pounced even more viciously, penning an "opposition-research hit piece-rife with errors-about" McKinney's wife Ann Liston, a Democratic consultant. Although Sun-Times Publisher and Editor Jim Kirk responded to the Rauner camp's allegations of a conflict of interest, saying the "'assault' on my integrity 'border[ed] on defamation' and represented 'a low point in the campaign,'" according to the political reporter, actions were allegedly taken days later to silence and demote him.

Enter Sun-Times Chairman Michael Ferro.

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