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Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
8:27pm
Tue Nov 10, 2015

Low-Wage Workers March In Downtown Chicago, Push For Fight For $15 Political Agenda (VIDEO)

Hundreds of low-wage Chicago workers and their allies hit the city's downtown streets Tuesday evening to call for a $15 an hour minimum wage, union recognition and other items on their new "voter agenda."

The protest, which started at the Thompson Center and ended with a march to a nearby McDonald's at Clark and Lake streets, was one among many Fight for $15 actions happening Tuesday in 500 U.S. cities.

Fast food and other low-wage workers chanted, "What do we want? $15! When do we want it? Now!"

PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
12:18pm
Tue Sep 2, 2014

Housing Needs Grow For An Aging America; Low-Income Illinoisans Struggle To Find Affordable Rentals

Progress Illinois takes a look at two recently-released housing reports. One highlights the growing housing needs of America's aging population, while the other examines the shortage of affordable rental units available for low-income households at the state and national levels.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
4:46pm
Tue Aug 26, 2014

New #WEmatter Twitter Campaign Amplifies Women's Economic Security Woes

Organizations and individuals across the country are taking to social media on Tuesday as part of a new campaign to promote policies designed to strengthen the economic security of women and families.

The launch of the social media movement coincides with Women's Equality Day, which marks the anniversary of women winning the right to vote on August 26, 1920. 

Those participating in the campaign are organizing under the hashtag "WEmatter" on Twitter and other social media outlets.

Quick Hit
by
4:33pm
Wed Mar 5, 2014

Guest Post: McDonald’s: Rising Inequality Could Spur Higher Wages

The following is from the Workers Organizing Committee of Chicago and the Fight for 15 campaign.

In its annual 10-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, McDonald’s, for the first time, admitted that it could be forced to raise wages due to increased focus on income inequality.

The company said that its results and financial condition could be affected by “the long-term trend toward higher wages and social expenses in both mature and developing markets, which may intensify with increasing public focus on matters of income inequality.”

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
3:18pm
Thu Jan 30, 2014

New Report Provides Sobering Look At Illinois Poverty Trends Over 50 Years

A new report from the Social IMPACT Research Center at the Heartland Alliance finds that the poverty rate in Illinois, at about 15 percent in 2012, is the same as it was in 1960.

The report, which comes on the heels of the War on Poverty's 50th anniversary, also shows that 388,000 Illinoisans still live in poverty despite having someone in their household who works full-time.  

“Today, the jobs that are available at the low-skilled end of the economy simply don’t provide wages and benefits that create economic security,” Social IMPACT Research Center Director Amy Terpstra said in a statement. “What this means is that, in Illinois, you can work full time and still be living in poverty.”

Since 1960, the number of working age Illinois men and women in poverty has increased, poverty rates have barely changed for African Americans and Latinos, and women are still more likely to be poor than men, the report showed.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
6:07pm
Tue Jan 21, 2014

Poll Explores U.S. Attitudes On Poverty 50 Years After 'War On Poverty' Was Launched

    In January of 1964, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson declared an “unconditional War on Poverty,” which played a part in cutting the nation's poverty rate in half betweem 1960 and 1973.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
4:59pm
Mon Nov 4, 2013

Report: Investments In Education During A Child's First 8 Years Of Life Crucial To Academic, Overall Success

A new national report argues that high-quality, early childhood programs that target the first eight years of a child's life, and include supports for parents lead to better success in school and adulthood. 

To help make its case, the report issued Monday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation highlighted a recent analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal study, which found just 36 percent of third graders had developed age-appropriate cognitive knowledge and skills. The longitudinal study started tracking 13,000 children who were enrolled in kindergarten during the 1998-1999 school year.

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