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Bobby Rush

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Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
2:47pm
Fri Jul 11, 2014

FHFA: 36,000 Underwater Chicago-Area Homeowners Eligible For Refinance Program (VIDEO)

Thousands of Chicago-area residents are eligible for, but have not taken advantage of, the federal Home Affordable Refinance Program, or HARP, which provides refinance opportunities for certain underwater homeowners.

Nearly 36,000 borrowers in the Chicago metro area are eligible to save between $2,000 to $3,000 annually by refinancing their mortgages as part of the program, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
11:10am
Mon Jun 2, 2014

Six Illinois Congressmen Get F's On Immigration Score Card

Most lawmakers in the GOP-led U.S. House are "failing the Latino community" when it comes to immigration issues, according to a preliminary score card released last week.

The initial 2014 National Immigration Score Card is based on immigration-related votes taken by the 435 House members of the current 113th Congress.

The worst score of 59 percent went to 219 House members, all of whom are Republicans including six from Illinois. A total of 170 House lawmakers, all Democrats, received the best score of 100 percent, with nine of them being from Illinois. As a whole, the House earned an average score of 77 percent.

“Our community is being disproportionately devastated by the broken immigration system that this Congress refuses to fix. This preliminary score card shows that most in Congress are clearly failing us on immigration right now,” said the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement's (LCLAA) Executive Director Hector Sanchez. “Latinos can no longer tolerate more excuses on why reform has not passed."

Quick Hit
by Aricka Flowers
9:42pm
Thu Mar 13, 2014

Schneider Pushes For Unemployment Benefits Vote In House, Senate Reaches Tentative Deal

U.S. Rep. Brad Schneider (D-IL,10) has taken steps to push for the reactivation of long-term unemployment benefits in his chamber.

On Wednesday, Schneider introduced a discharge petition that could force the House to vote on an unemployment benefits extension package that would help the two million Americans who have seen their jobless insurance lapse since the December 28 expiration, which immediately affected 80,000 Illinoisans. An average of 72,000 Americans are losing their unemployment insurance each week as a result of the expiration of benefits for the long-term unemployed.

“Failing to extend unemployment insurance, a critical lifeline for many of our families, is shortsighted and hurts our communities and businesses,” Schneider said in a  release announcing his plans. “If my colleagues want to vote against the extension, I respect their right to disagree; but failing to even allow a vote goes against the very progress that families and our constituents demand. Partisan politics must not be allowed to get in the way of doing the right thing for our middle class families. That’s why I will file a measure to end the gridlock and force a vote on extending unemployment insurance.”

Quick Hit
by
1:57pm
Tue Feb 11, 2014

U.S. Rep. Rush Applauds FCC’s Decision To Lower Prison Phone Rates

The following comes from the office of U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush (D-IL,1).

For three straight Congresses, Energy and Commerce Committee Member Bobby L. Rush introduced legislation and advocated nationally to dramatically reduce exorbitant rates that are charged for phone calls between incarcerated individuals and their families and loved ones. Today, Rep. Rush raises his voice along with these families in commending the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and especially Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, for its recent actions to lower prison phone rates. The new rates will protect families and their imprisoned loved ones when making phone calls to people in prison, jails, or detention centers.

Beginning today, February 11, 2014, and pursuant to a recently adopted FCC interim rate cap, interstate long-distance phone calls cannot cost more than 25 cents per minute for collect calls, or 21 cents per minute for debit and prepaid calls. Prior to today, interstate long distance calls could run as high as $17 for a 15-minute call at some state correctional facilities and jails. Due to the rate cap, the same 15-minute call cannot exceed $3.15. 

Quick Hit
by Aaron Cynic
8:48pm
Thu Nov 21, 2013

South Siders March To U Of Chicago Hospital In Demand Of A Trauma Center

More than 200 demonstrators marched down Cottage Grove Ave. on Chicago's South Side Wednesday night to the University of Chicago Medical Center. The protesters demanded the hospital open a Level 1 trauma center.

While chanting “how can you ignore while we’re dying at your door,” the group left two mock coffins covered in flowers across outside of the hospital on 58th Street. The demonstration came just hours after a state hearing hosted by state Sen. Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago) to discuss the lack of a trauma center on Chicago's South Side. Calling the area a “trauma desert,” community groups and activists say a South Side trauma center would save lives. 

“People wouldn’t have to travel as far,” said Zan Adams, co-founder of RISE Chicago, a member group of the Trauma Center Coalition, and organizer of the demonstration.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
2:23pm
Fri Sep 13, 2013

Report: Bolstering Earned Income Tax Credit For Childless Workers Could Reduce Poverty

The federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for low-income working families helps to promote work and offset the tax burden households face. But the federal aid program has some glaring problems, according to a recent report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

The tax credit reaches few low-income childless workers, and those who are eligible see little relief from the hefty federal tax load they are forced to shoulder.

“This is the group we’re taxing deeper into poverty,” said Dan Lesser, director of economic justice at the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law.

There are two pieces of legislation pending in Congress focused on combating this issue by expanding EITC to more childless workers and boosting the maximum credit from $487 to $1,350.

Samantha Tuttle, director of policy and advocacy at the Heartland Alliance, said increasing the maximum credit would make a “huge difference” in the lives of low-wage, childless workers.

“That’s a huge percentage of income for people experiencing poverty,” she said.

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