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Quick Hit
by Aaron Cynic
1:39pm
Fri Nov 1, 2013

SEIU Security Officers Hold Halloween-Themed Flash Mob To Call For A Fair Contract (VIDEO)

Nearly 100 SEIU* Local 1 security officers and their supporters staged a rally and flash mob at the Thompson Center Wednesday to bring attention to their campaign for better wages and affordable health care. Presently, full time security officers can pay up to $1,543 a month for health insurance coverage for a family of four. In some cases, that could be more than 80 percent of an officer’s monthly income.

“We’re just asking for fair wages, health benefits and [that they] just treat us with integrity and respect,” said Kenyatta Sinclair, a security officer who has been on the job for five years. Sinclair, who makes $13.60 an hour, does not currently have health benefits.

“I would have to buy my own plan, and I don’t make enough to buy one,” Sinclair explained.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
10:17am
Thu Oct 31, 2013

Chicagoans Talk 2014 Budget With Progressive Reform Caucus At Town Hall Meeting (UPDATED)

Public schools, mental health services and Mayor Rahm Emanuel's plan to phaseout the city's health care subsidy for a number of retired municipal workers were some of the concerns Chicagoans raised at a budget town hall meeting Wednesday night.

The city council's Progressive Reform Caucus held the packed town hall meeting at United Electrical Workers Hall and heard comments from dozens of residents about the mayor's proposed 2014 budget, which was unveiled last week.

The mayor's $8.7 billion 2014 budget does not increase property, sales or gas taxes, but Progressive Reform Caucus members expressed worry that the spending plan relies mainly on other increased taxes and fees that would impact everyone from drivers to cigarette smokers to cable TV customers as a means to help close the city's $339 million deficit.

PI Original
by Aricka Flowers
2:40pm
Thu Oct 17, 2013

Government Shutdown Ends, Debt Ceiling Crisis Averted — For Now

The federal government is now open, workers are back on the job and the debt ceiling deadline of October 17 was barely met following a late night for Congress and the president. Progress Illinois takes a look the new deal, the effects of the government shutdown and what's next for Congress.

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