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Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
9:47am
Sun Oct 11, 2015

Environmentalists Take Aim At Morgan Stanley Over Coal Industry Financing

Environmentalists are putting pressure on Morgan Stanley to cut its financing ties to the coal industry as part of a larger disinvestment campaign aimed at big banks.

Organizers with the environmental group Rainforest Action Network (RAN) urged the investment firm to end its financing of coal mining and coal power during Friday protests held outside Morgan Stanley branches in nine major U.S. cities, including Chicago.

"Morgan Stanley is one of a few remaining large banks that is still funding dirty coal," said Chicago RAN volunteer Charlie Ryan, who distributed flyers about the anti-coal campaign outside a downtown Morgan Stanley location at 440 S. LaSalle St.

"If you look at some of the things they're doing, for example, they continue to finance mountaintop removal. Mountaintop removal is one of the worst ways to mine coal. They blow up the mountain. They don't repair it."

PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
4:03pm
Wed Aug 5, 2015

Petcoke Battle Continues On Chicago's Southeast Side

Progress Illinois recaps the latest news involving the petcoke issue on Chicago's Southeast Side.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
4:04pm
Mon Dec 8, 2014

Report: 'Ambitious' Growth In U.S. Wind Energy Needed To Address Climate Change

If 30 percent of the nation's electricity came from wind energy by 2030, the country would sharply cut global warming pollution and meet carbon-reduction targets in the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Clean Power Plan.

That's according to a recent report by the Environment Illinois Research and Education Center, which analyzed the potential benefits of a scenario in which wind power supplied 30 percent of U.S. electricity needs by 2030. Wind power currently generates 4 percent of the country's electricity.

Achieving 30 percent wind energy by 2030 would reduce U.S. power-plant carbon pollution to 40 percent below 2005 levels, according to the report. And those projected carbon reductions would be more than enough to comply with the EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan regulations, which look to slash CO2 emissions from existing U.S. power plants to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.

"That much wind power would help states meet and exceed the carbon dioxide emission reductions called for by the Environmental Protection Agency's draft Clean Power Plan, and help the nation meet its commitment to cut U.S. carbon pollution by 26 to 28 percent by 2025" as part of a climate change agreement with China announced by President Barack Obama in November, the report reads.

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