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Productivity
Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
3:45pm
Thu Nov 3, 2016

Report: Racial, Class Inequality A 'Dual Penalty' On Black Workers' Wages

Wage growth among African-American workers has taken a double hit since 1979 due to the growing black-white wage gap and overall wage stagnation, according to a new paper from the Economic Policy Institute. 

The left-leaning think tank finds that median hourly wages for black workers "could be 87 percent higher in the absence of racial and class inequality."

Researchers examined the 1979 to 2015 time period, during which "overall median wages did not track productivity growth and racial wage gaps did not close, but instead widened."

"This kept wage growth for black workers much, much lower than it would have been otherwise," the report adds.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
11:52pm
Tue Mar 1, 2016

Report: Workers' Share Of Corporate Income Down $535 Billion Since 2000

U.S. workers have seen their share of corporate income for compensation drop from 82 percent to 75 percent since 2000, shows a recent analysis by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI).

A 7-point decrease "might not seem like a lot, but if labor's share had not fallen this much, employees in the corporate sector would have $535 billion more in their paychecks today," EPI's research and policy director Josh Bivens said in a paper on the findings.

That money would work out to be a $3,770 raise for each U.S. worker if all working Americans, not just those employed in the corporate sector, got a slice of the pie.

Quick Hit
by Ashlee Rezin
2:19pm
Wed Jun 12, 2013

Aging Workforce Does Not Negatively Impact Productivity, But Does Hurt Young Workers

Contrary to popular belief, an increase in the proportion of older employees in America’s workforce has not led to a deterioration of productivity, according to a recent study from the Brookings Institution.

“A lot of people feel or suspect that aging workers are more fragile, not as up to date technologically, are slower to learn, and therefore may be less productive than younger workers,” said Gray Burtless, an economist with the Brookings Institution and author of the report. “But recent years have seen a sharp increase in an older workforce, and it has not had an adverse impact on productivity.”