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Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
12:49pm
Mon Apr 6

Report: Recent Generations Of Illinoisans Inheriting Warmer, More 'Dangerous' Climate

A new report tracking the effects of climate change over the last five generations of Americans shows young people in Illinois and across the country have inherited a "hotter, more extreme" climate.

For its "Dangerous Inheritance" report, the Environment America Research and Policy Center examined changes in average temperatures, precipitation and sea-level rise over the course of five generations -- from the Baby Boomers to Generation Z, defined as those born between 1995 to 2009. Researchers include climate projections for today's Generation Alpha, or those born between 2010 and 2025.

Younger generations in Illinois and across the country are facing warmer temperatures plus more frequent and extreme storms than when the Baby Boomers were entering adulthood, according to the report.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
4:04pm
Mon Dec 8, 2014

Report: 'Ambitious' Growth In U.S. Wind Energy Needed To Address Climate Change

If 30 percent of the nation's electricity came from wind energy by 2030, the country would sharply cut global warming pollution and meet carbon-reduction targets in the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Clean Power Plan.

That's according to a recent report by the Environment Illinois Research and Education Center, which analyzed the potential benefits of a scenario in which wind power supplied 30 percent of U.S. electricity needs by 2030. Wind power currently generates 4 percent of the country's electricity.

Achieving 30 percent wind energy by 2030 would reduce U.S. power-plant carbon pollution to 40 percent below 2005 levels, according to the report. And those projected carbon reductions would be more than enough to comply with the EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan regulations, which look to slash CO2 emissions from existing U.S. power plants to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.

"That much wind power would help states meet and exceed the carbon dioxide emission reductions called for by the Environmental Protection Agency's draft Clean Power Plan, and help the nation meet its commitment to cut U.S. carbon pollution by 26 to 28 percent by 2025" as part of a climate change agreement with China announced by President Barack Obama in November, the report reads.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
4:11pm
Mon Dec 1, 2014

Business, Evangelical Groups Join Forces To Support EPA Clean Power Plan

Groups representing businesses and evangelicals teamed up Monday to announce their strong support for the Environmental Protection Agency's proposal to curb carbon pollution from existing U.S. power plants.

Public comments on the EPA's Clean Power Plan, which was proposed in June and looks to slash carbon emissions to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030, are due Monday.

Environmental Entrepreneurs, or E2, a national, nonpartisan business group advocating for "sound environmental policies that grow the economy," and the Evangelical Environmental Network, which describes itself on its website as a "ministry dedicated to the care of God's creation," each delivered comments to the EPA on Monday in favor of the Clean Power Plan.

"Our two groups represent very different sectors of America," E2's Executive Director Bob Keefe said on a conference call with reporters. "It shows, I think, the really broad support for the Clean Power Plan."

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