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Michael Randle

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Quick Hit
by Adam Doster
11:05am
Fri Nov 19, 2010

Report: Tamms "Need Not Be This Harsh"

This summer, U.S. District Court Judge G. Patrick Murphy delivered a significant but overlooked court decision ordering the Illinois Department of Corrections to give inmates at the state's only supermax prison, Tamms Correctional Center, greater due process rights. But the judge didn't stop there.

PI Original
by Adam Doster
1:49pm
Thu Oct 28, 2010

"Setting The Record Straight" On Quinn's Early Release Program

If Gov. Pat Quinn loses the governor's race on Tuesday, analysts will point to the MGT Push controversy as a key component of the Democrat's downfall. Does Quinn deserve the blame?

Quick Hit
by Adam Doster
1:33pm
Mon Sep 27, 2010

DOC Fights Due Process At Tamms

Earlier this summer, a federal judge penned a scathing decision questioning some of the fundamental practices employed at Illinois' infamous Tamms Correctional Center. Most practically, the judge ordered that the Illinois Department of Correction must give inmates at the supermax institution greater due process rights. Here's how we described the ruling in July:

Quick Hit
by Adam Doster
12:56pm
Wed Sep 8, 2010

Reformers Sound Off On Randle Resignation

Mayor Richard Daley isn't the only Illinois official who recently announced his resignation. Last Thursday, Illinois Department of Corrections director Michael Randle said he will step down from his post at the end of the month to pursue a new opportunity in Ohio.

Quick Hit
by Micah Maidenberg
2:49pm
Fri Sep 3, 2010

Brady On Prison Reform? Still Waiting.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Brady's refusal to take specific stands on key issues facing the state was a common thread of his campaign this summer.

PI Original
by Adam Doster
1:37pm
Mon Aug 16, 2010

The Lessons Of MGT Push

A judge has criticized Illinois' prison officials (and by extension, the Quinn administration) for poor oversight of the state's early release programs. Now is the time to reform them.

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